Thursday, March 21, 2019

Holi-Festival of Colors



The word Holi originated from the name of one mythological demon named Holika. According ancient Hindu mythology King of the Demons obtained a boon which made him deathless. With the boon he became arrogant and wanted to be worshipped. His son Prahlada didn’t want to listen to him, and continued to worship Lord Vishnu. Out of rage the king wanted to destroy his own son. In order to help the king in his mission, king’s sister Holika lit up a pyre, and sit on it. She took Prahlada on the pyre. She was sitting on the pyre wrapping herself with a cloak which was going to protect her from fire. However, Prahlada had nothing. Lord Vishnu came to help Prahlada. The cloak suddenly flew away from Holika, and landed on Prahlada. By this way Lord Vishnu saved Prahlada, and Holika burned to death. 



So, Holi is celebrated as the victory of good over evil. Holi starts with lighting up  a bonfire , Holika Dahan (buring of Holika) symbolizing the death of evil on the full moon day of spring. The following day is celebrated with colors. This is also known as festival of colors or festivals spring. Apart from mythological story this also specifies the end of winter and onset of spring.

People celebrate the day by smearing different vibrant color on each other, and eating sweets. 
Living far from home country I rarely get the vibes of those festivals. However, I can at least cook few of the related food items at home.

One of the prime beverage of the festival is Thandai, chilled almond and milk drink. Gujiya, a crisp flaky pastry is one of the popular sweets of the festival. I made Gujiya along with few other sweets. This was a small way of mine to celebrate the day. 


19 comments:

Kathy Leonia said...

omom I am so hungry!

Julie's Creative Lifestyle said...

The food you made looks so yummy. :)

Luana said...

that's nice! I did not know anything about!

xoxo
Guria do Século Passado

Betsy said...

How interesting and good of you to share the story. I would love to know what is in that pretty pastry you have on the plate and in the bowl. Looks so good.

Nancy Chan said...

The food and pastry look good for snacks.

Anna said...

Thank you for sharing, I did not know that before. However I know how it is to live far away from your culture, it is difficult to keep up with all the traditions. Like you I try with some things at least. Your food looks delicious! Anna x

ALLIE NYC said...

This was interesting lesson in folklore. And this post made me VERY hungry lol!

Allie of
www.allienyc.com

Elena M said...

Mmmm... It looks delicious!
Fantastic post!

white and vintage said...

I have never heard about this festival. It sounds great!
Have a nice evening <3

Margaret D said...

That looks delicious - interesting story there.

Rafa Oliveira said...

Delicious post.

www.paginasempreto.blogspot.com.br

Juliana Ferreira said...

Delicious post

Kisses
www.pimentadeacucar.com

White Rose said...

Hi Krishna beautiful post my friend and your food looks very yummy xx

Miguel Gouveia said...

Thanks a lot :D

looks delicious my friend

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eileeninmd said...

Hello, thanks for sharing the culture and traditions. The food looks delicious. Enjoy your day, have a great week!

Jeanie said...

This is very interesting to me -- I learned something today! And that plate looks WONDERFUL!

Thanks for stopping over at my blog. Love your visits!

Mirtillo14 said...

Interessante non conoscevo questa festa dove il bene trionfa sul male e ottimi i cibi cucinati. Saluti.

Pixel Peeper said...

I knew about the Holi festival, but didn't know its background. You made some wonderful foods to celebrate!

Teresa said...

Me ha encantado saber del festival. La comida se ve riquísima. Un beso.

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